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my1930s:

Salvador Dali in a bathtub
June 19, 1944: Surrealist Salvador Dali poses in his small temporary workplace, a bathtub in the Ambassador Hotel. The Times wrote in a front-page story:

He likes to work in small, cramped places.
“Protection,” he says, fondly patting a close wall.
Yesterday it was the bathtub.
But don’t get the idea that the fellow is washed up.

The artist was in California during preparation for a production of the ballet “Mad Tristan,” for which he was designing the set and costumes. The ballet premiered in New York later that year.
Source: Los Angeles Times

my1930s:

Salvador Dali in a bathtub

June 19, 1944: Surrealist Salvador Dali poses in his small temporary workplace, a bathtub in the Ambassador Hotel. The Times wrote in a front-page story:

He likes to work in small, cramped places.

“Protection,” he says, fondly patting a close wall.

Yesterday it was the bathtub.

But don’t get the idea that the fellow is washed up.

The artist was in California during preparation for a production of the ballet “Mad Tristan,” for which he was designing the set and costumes. The ballet premiered in New York later that year.

Source: Los Angeles Times

theoddmentemporium:

Convicted forger A. Schiller was serving his time in Sing Sing prison in the late 1800s when guards found him dead in his cell. On his body they found seven regular straight pins whose heads measured the typical 47/1000ths of an inch or 1.17 millimeters in diameter. Under 500 magnification it was found that the tiny etchings seen on the heads of the pins were the words to The Lord’s Prayer, which is 65 words and 254 letters long. Of the seven pins, six were silver and one was gold - the gold pin’s prayer was flawless and a true masterpiece. Schiller had spent the last 25 years of his life creating the pins, using a tool too small to be seen by the naked eye. It is estimated that it took 1,863 separate carving strokes to make it. Schiller went blind because of his artwork.

theoddmentemporium:

Convicted forger A. Schiller was serving his time in Sing Sing prison in the late 1800s when guards found him dead in his cell. On his body they found seven regular straight pins whose heads measured the typical 47/1000ths of an inch or 1.17 millimeters in diameter. Under 500 magnification it was found that the tiny etchings seen on the heads of the pins were the words to The Lord’s Prayer, which is 65 words and 254 letters long. Of the seven pins, six were silver and one was gold - the gold pin’s prayer was flawless and a true masterpiece. Schiller had spent the last 25 years of his life creating the pins, using a tool too small to be seen by the naked eye. It is estimated that it took 1,863 separate carving strokes to make it. Schiller went blind because of his artwork.