Welcome to "All That Is Odd" (formerly Curious History). The world is filled with strange, odd and inexplicable wonders. You will find thousands of them here. Please consider a small donation to keep this site running (upper left corner)!

It’s an Odd & Small World After All

In its 40th year, Nikon Small World is one of the leading forums for recognizing excellent microscopic photography. Subjects above cover biological specimens.

1) Jumping Spider Eyes Reflected Light - 20X

Noah Fram-Schwartz; Greenwich, Connecticut, USA

2) Bed Bug (Cimex lectularius) - 50X

Mr. Stefano Barone; Cremona, Italy

3) Developing Mouse Embryo Eye - 20X

Ms. Zsófia László; Budapest, Hungary

4) Ant Eye Reflected Light - 20X

Noah Fram-Schwartz; Greenwich, Connecticut, USA

5) Underside of the Brown Dog and Lonestar Tick Mouthparts - 100X

Dr. Igor Robert Siwanowicz; Ashburn, Virginia, USA

source

Crabzilla or Hoax?

Is this a freakishly huge crab or just someone bored playing with photoshop? You might have seen this image within the last few days. The above photographs of Whistable harbour led people to believe that a monster-size crab (nick-named “crabzilla”) is living off the Kent coast in the United Kingdom.

Residents of Whitstable were stunned when the picture appeared to show a huge crab at the base of the coastal town’s harbour.

However a marine biologist, Dr. Verity Nye, who is an ocean and earth science researcher at the University of Southampton states: “The idea of a giant “crabzilla” would very exciting. Unfortunately, I think this is a hoax.”

She further stated that the United Kingdom does have large crabs but not anywhere near this size. The largest crabs tend to stay in deeper water and that this particular image is a different shape than previously identified huge crustaceans.

But this is just one scientist’s opinion…anything is in the realm of possibility when it comes to ocean life. Hundreds, if not thousands, of new species of marine life are discovered every year. Perhaps he’ll make another appearance…

source

(Source: allthatisodd.com)

Newly Discovered Deep Sea Worms Unknown to Science

Scientist and marine researcher Alexander Semenov, recently released a number of incredible new photographs of worms, several of which may be completely unknown to science.

Half of the photos were taken near the Great Barrier Reef in Australia during a 2-week conference on marine worms called polychaetes. Semenov photographed 222 different worm species which are now in the process of being studied and documented by scientists.

The other half of the photos were taken during Semenov’s normal course of work at the White Sea Biological Station in northern Russia where he’s head of the scientific divers team. 

(Source: thisiscolossal.com)

The Ancient Art of Honey Hunting in Nepal

The Gurange tribes of Nepal have been collecting honey from Himalayan cliffs for centuries. The Gurung are master honey hunters, risking their lives collecting honeycomb using nothing more than handmade rope ladders and long sticks known as tangos.

Most of the honey bees’ nests are located on steep, inaccessible, southwest facing cliffs to avoid predators and for increased exposure to direct sunlight.

Aside from the dangers of falling, they are harvesting honey from the largest honey bees in the world. The Himalayan honey bee can grow up to 3 cm in length.

Before a hunt can commence, the honey hunters are required to perform a ceremony to placate the cliff gods. This involves sacrificing a sheep, offering flowers, fruits and rice, and praying to the cliff gods to ensure a safe hunt.

Photographer Andrew Newey spent two weeks living with the Gurung in central Nepal, documenting the risks and skill involved in this dying tradition.

(Source: theguardian.com)

Baby Hedgehog
England—Just four days old and 2.5 inches long, an abandoned hoglet—as baby hedgehogs are often called—snuggles up to a folded towel at a rescue center in Royal Tunbridge Wells, Kent. Warmth and cleanliness are vital to keeping the tiny animals healthy.
Photo by Phil Yeomans, Bournemouth News and Picture Service

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Baby Hedgehog

England—Just four days old and 2.5 inches long, an abandoned hoglet—as baby hedgehogs are often called—snuggles up to a folded towel at a rescue center in Royal Tunbridge Wells, Kent. Warmth and cleanliness are vital to keeping the tiny animals healthy.

Photo by Phil Yeomans, Bournemouth News and Picture Service

(Source: National Geographic)

rorschachx:

Mudskippers - Krabi, Thailand | image by Daniel Trim

They are completely amphibious fish, fish that can use their pectoral fins to walk on land.  Mudskippers are quite active when out of water, feeding and interacting with one another, for example to defend their territories.
 They are found in tropical, subtropical and temperate regions, including the Indo-Pacific and the Atlantic coast of Africa.
 (via wiki)

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rorschachx:

Mudskippers - Krabi, Thailand | image by Daniel Trim

They are completely amphibious fish, fish that can use their pectoral fins to walk on land.  Mudskippers are quite active when out of water, feeding and interacting with one another, for example to defend their territories.

They are found in tropicalsubtropical and temperate regions, including the Indo-Pacific and the Atlantic coast of Africa.

(via wiki)

Dec 30th at 3PM / via: rorschachx / op: rorschachx / tagged: science. animals. fish. mudskippers. krabi. thailand. / reblog / 1,995 notes