Welcome to "All That Is Odd" (formerly Curious History). The world is filled with strange, odd and inexplicable wonders. You will find thousands of them here. Please consider a small donation to keep this site running (upper left corner)!

Melissani Cave, Greece

This amazing cave was first discovered in 1951 and was opened for the public in 1963. Melissani Cave is located on the east coast of the island of Kefalonia in Greece. The cave has two large, water filled halls with an island in the middle. The first hall has a big oval opening to the surface where the sunlight streams in, illuminating its stunning natural beauty. The second is a huge cavern with an arched roof featuring numerous stalactites and stalagmites.The entire length of the cave is 100 meters. The best time to visit the cave is in the middle of a bright sunny day. Tours are done by boats that take you on a tour through both halls of the breathtaking cave.

(Source: twistedsifter.com)

Mountain Top Monastery, Greece

(Source: National Geographic)

World’s Oldest Socks
These odd, ancient socks are the earliest knitted items in the Victoria & Albert Museum’s collection and quite possibly the oldest socks in the world. Made in 300-499 AD, these Egyptian socks were excavated in the burial grounds of ancient Oxyrhynchus, a Greek colony on the Nile in central Egypt at the end of the 19th century. They have a divided toe and are designed to be worn with sandals.
Particularly intriguing is the technique used to construct these red wool socks. Called nålbindning, or single-needle knitting, this time-consuming process required only a single thread. The technique was frequently used for close-fitting garments for the head, feet and hands because of its elastic qualities. Primarily from prehistoric times, nålbindning came before the two-needle knitting that’s standard today; each needle was crafted from wood or bone that was “flat, blunt and between 6 -10 cm long, relatively large-eyed at one end or the eye is near the middle.”

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World’s Oldest Socks

These odd, ancient socks are the earliest knitted items in the Victoria & Albert Museum’s collection and quite possibly the oldest socks in the world. Made in 300-499 AD, these Egyptian socks were excavated in the burial grounds of ancient Oxyrhynchus, a Greek colony on the Nile in central Egypt at the end of the 19th century. They have a divided toe and are designed to be worn with sandals.

Particularly intriguing is the technique used to construct these red wool socks. Called nålbindning, or single-needle knitting, this time-consuming process required only a single thread. The technique was frequently used for close-fitting garments for the head, feet and hands because of its elastic qualities. Primarily from prehistoric times, nålbindning came before the two-needle knitting that’s standard today; each needle was crafted from wood or bone that was “flat, blunt and between 6 -10 cm long, relatively large-eyed at one end or the eye is near the middle.”

Ancient Greek Medical Instruments
Greek medical practitioners were unique amongst the ancient world in that many weren’t first and foremost priests, instead they were philosophers and learned men who were also knowledgeable about the various gods and their powers. It was during the Greek era that many of the medical terms in use today were first coined to describe types of diseases and illnesses, and the types of remedy required, and it was in this time that anatomy was most progressed thru dissection of human bodies.

Ancient Greek Medical Instruments

Greek medical practitioners were unique amongst the ancient world in that many weren’t first and foremost priests, instead they were philosophers and learned men who were also knowledgeable about the various gods and their powers. It was during the Greek era that many of the medical terms in use today were first coined to describe types of diseases and illnesses, and the types of remedy required, and it was in this time that anatomy was most progressed thru dissection of human bodies.